Wednesday

Wednesday

Breakout Sessions 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

Please be aware that the schedule reflects the Eastern Time Zone. The programming schedule will be continuously updated leading up to the event.

 

Mind the Gap: Early Diagnosis in Systems Work    

Julia Harkleroad, MS, LCMFT

It can take nearly 11 years for a proper diagnosis in mental healthcare. There are many contributing factors to the delay in treatment. This session will focus on how family therapists without special training in mental disorders, such as OCD, can mind the gap. Family therapists may be the first providers to detect mental disorder in a system even if their therapeutic modality refrains from labeling disorders. Many mental disorders require specific treatment for remission. Being prepared to serve family and professional systems means being prepared to encounter disorders, initiate conversation about treatment, and set boundaries around professional experience and training. To ensure no mental disorder is left untreated, this session will introduce feedback-informed practices, differentiate specialties in mental health vs. mental disorder, and assess the risks of delay in treatment for disorders such as OCD, Major Depression, and more.

Learning Objectives:

  • Based on this session's content, I am able to identify the difference between services for mental disorder and services for mental health.
  • Based on this session's content, I am able to define and communicate my professional limits in the treatment of mental disorder with my clients.
  • Based on this session's content, I am able incorporate feedback from my clients into the delivery of my services to enhance positive outcome measures and close the mental healthcare gap.

Understanding Buffalos: Theoretical Foundations for Treating Disruptive Behavior Disorders – Part 1     

Michael Whitehead, PhD, LMFT

Disruptive Behavior Disorders (ADHD, ODD, CD, ASD, etc.) tend to be the most sought out concerns for families and schools (Christenson, Crane, Malloy, & Parker, 2016), yet therapists tend to shy away from these cases (Wampler & Whitehead, 2020). The first part of this two part presentation will review important theoretical foundations and family system principles necessary for the systemic treatment of disruptive behavior disorders. Triangulation, differentiation (Bowen, 1978), child temperament (Thomas & Chess, 1977), and the coercion model (Patterson, 2016) will be reviewed and explored to better understand the etiology and systemic dynamics of childhood disruptive behavior disorders. The metaphor of training buffalos will be introduced to reinforce these theoretical foundations and set the stage for effective interventions for families with a child(ren) experiencing disruptive behavior disorders. 

Part 2 (Training Buffalos: Systemic Interventions for Disruptive Behavior Disorders) will build on this presentation with live demonstrations of effective systemic interventions for these families.

Learning Objectives:

  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to describe 3 family systems principles important to the development and treatment of disruptive behaviors.
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to identify and discuss the coercion cycle and its application to disruptive behavior disorders.
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to describe how child temperament plays a role in the development of disruptive behavior disorders.

Understanding the Dynamics of Chronic Illness/Pain & Disability     

Julie Payne, LMFT

Working with clients experiencing chronic illness / chronic pain. This presentation discusses prominent issues that clients face when living with chronic pain/illness, navigating the healthcare system, impact on the family and relationships, and helpful tools for therapists when working with this population.

Learning Objectives:

  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to identify 3 types of ableism.
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to understand common challenges clients face.
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to learn ways to work with clients living with chronic illness/pain and disability.

Falling Back in Love with Being a Therapist     

Christie Eppler, PhD, LMFT

Jen Hutchings, PhD, LMFT

Inspired by Kai Cheng Thom’s Falling Back in Love with Being Human, this experiential session explores how therapists cope with burnout. Throughout their careers, clinicians are prone to compassion fatigue and secondary trauma. Fostering systemic resilience in oneself and the community requires creating supportive connections, deconstructing unhelpful social messages, and practicing awareness, compassion, and creativity. Using narrative techniques and resilience theory, participants will enhance their thriving skills and self-care practices to mediate challenging clinical experiences in and out of session. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to identify three symptoms of therapist burnout.
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to identify at least three components of systemic resilience. 
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to practice at least one coping mechanism to alleviate therapist burnout.

Narrative Supervision as Counter Story Development     

Danna Abraham, PhD, LMFT

Traditional Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) supervision often emphasizes expert-based supervision models that often leave little room for highlighting personal knowledge and the lived experiences of supervisees. In this presentation, we will explore the fundamental principles of narrative supervision to counter the effects of traditional supervision models. Specifically, we will center our explorations to bring forth therapists’ personal knowledge and values that are often marginalized in the process of training aspiring therapists. By focusing on developing an experience-near framework linked to a long history of principled actions in the therapist’s life we hope to support the integration of personal values into MFT practice. In other words, narrative supervision as counter story development can serve as a powerful antidote, promoting self-knowledge and offering the means for transformational experiences within and across broader institutional systems.

Learning Objectives:

  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to understand the limitations of traditional expert-based Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) supervision models, particularly how they often marginalize personal knowledge and lived experiences of supervisees.
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to gain a comprehensive understanding of the fundamental principles of narrative supervision and how it serves as a counter to traditional supervision models, emphasizing the importance of therapists' personal knowledge and values.
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to integrate an experience-near framework in MFT supervisory practices that promotes self-knowledge. 

 

Supporting Trans and Non-Binary Clients – Part 1 – Identity     

Sar Surmick, MA, LMFT

Trans, Non-Binary, and Gender Expansive folks currently make up around 20% of the US population under the age of 22. What used to be a specialty is showing up in therapy rooms across the US. These clients have a right to quality and affirming care. They also have reasonable expectations about our knowledge & awareness, and yet few of us were ever taught how to work with them. In Part 1 we’ll look at some foundational information and concepts you need to know when working with these populations. We’ll discuss some basic definitions, Identity formation, Trans Identity expressions, and population features. We will practice identity affirmation and talk about why it’s so important in the therapy room. And we’ll answer your questions about working with these growing and vulnerable populations. This workshop will use lecture, discussion, and exercises to explore how to work with Trans, Non-Binary, and Gender Expansive clients. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Based on this session's content, I am able to: define the difference between sex and gender.
  • Based on this session's content, I am able to: define at least three different Trans and Trans adjacent identities. 
  • Based on this session's content, I am able to: apply my knowledge to affirming behavior in and out of the therapy room.

Emotionally Focused Therapy with L/G/B/T/Q/+ Romantic Relationships       

Caitlin Edwards, PhD

Andrea Wittenborn, PhD

This session will provide participants with empirically based recommendations for the use of Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) with members of LGBTQ + communities. EFT therapists working with LGBTQ + romantic relationships must account for the unique lived experiences of sexual and gender minorities, such as minority stress, identity development, and queer joy, which inform attachment experiences and relationships. Participants will gain a better understanding of therapist preparation, knowledge development, practice set up and orientation, and ways of adapting each step and stage of EFT to account for the unique lived experiences of members of LGBTQ + communities.  

Learning Objectives:

  • Based on this session's content, I can identify why EFT should be adapted for LGBTQ + romantic relationships.
  • Based on this session's content, I can understand how to adapt EFT when working with LGBTQ + romantic relationships.
  • Based on this session's content, I can describe the knowledge, preparation, and clinical skill development necessary for using EFT with LGBTQ + romantic relationships.

Breakout Sessions 9:45 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

Training Buffalos: Systemic Interventions for Disruptive Behavior Disorders – Part 2     

Michael Whitehead, PhD, LMFT

Disruptive Behavior Disorders (ADHD, ODD, CD, ASD, etc.) tend to be the most sought out concerns for families and schools (Crane, Malloy, & Parker, 2016), yet therapists tend to shy away from these cases (Wampler & Whitehead, 2020). Over 50 years of research tells us how to help children with these disorders (Granic & Patterson, 2006), yet most of the interventions that are still used actually perpetuate the problem (Bearss, Johnson, & Smith, 2015) Kaminski & Claussen (2017) continue to find that the most important aspect of treating DBD’s is having a systemically informed multi-modal treatment approach. 
The second part of this two part presentation will build upon the theoretical foundation presented in part one (Understanding Buffalos: Theoretical Foundations for Treating Disruptive Behavior Disorders) by demonstrating several systemic play therapy interventions that have been effective for treating DBD’s.  
A showcase of video-recorded sessions and live demonstrations will be utilized to help participants better conceptualize the interventions.

Learning Objectives:

  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to identify and utilize appropriate filial/directive/child-centered play therapy interventions for families with disruptive behavior disorders.
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to demonstrate through role play, the use of a play therapy intervention for triangulation.
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to identify the role of the systemic therapist at involving parents and extra-systemic adults in the therapeutic process.

The Neurobiology and Treatment of Couples     

Harvey Joanning

The presentation will focus on the Neurobiology and Treatment of Couples. Primary emotion systems in the brain and endocrine systems that drive each stage of relationship development, Romance, Attraction, and Attachment, will be described. Strategies and interventions based on neuroscience will be detailed for assisting couples at each stage of relationship development. Particular emphasis will be given to dealing with couples in distressed relationships. How these neuropsychological strategies add to “talk therapy” will be detailed.

Learning Objectives:

  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to identify primary emotion systems in the brain.
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to identify hormones that drive intimate behavior.
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to better assist distressed couples to improve their relationships.

Trauma and PTSD: Implications for Trauma-Informed Care     

Jennifer Pemberton, PhD

This workshop will present prevalence information and the developmental impact of sexual abuse and trauma on neurobiological, emotional, behavioral, and social functioning.  A comprehensive approach to trauma-informed care will be discussed that includes evidence-based therapy models, innovative group treatment strategies, and a multidisciplinary service delivery model. Vicarious trauma will be addressed for clinicians working with trauma and self-care strategies identified.

Learning Objectives:

  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to identify the prevalence of trauma and the impact of trauma on neurobiological, behavioral, emotional, and social functioning.
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to identify what trauma-informed care means and implement innovative, holistic, and comprehensive treatment strategies for children, adolescents and adults with traumatic experiences.
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to incorporate self-care strategies to address vicarious trauma.

Supporting Trans and Non-Binary Clients – Part 2 – Clinical Practice     

Sar Surmick, MA, LMFT

Trans, Non-Binary, and Gender Expansive folks currently make up around 20% of the US population under the age of 22. What used to be a specialty is showing up in therapy rooms across the US. These clients have a right to quality and affirming care. They also have reasonable expectations about our knowledge & awareness, and yet few of us were ever taught how to work with them. In Part 2 we’ll look at working with these populations in the therapy room: what to expect, what to watch for, and what to explore. We’ll discuss what gender dysphoria is, how it shows up, and how it interacts with other mental health issues. We look at some identity skills you can use. And we’ll answer your questions about working with these growing and vulnerable populations. This workshop will use lecture, discussion, and exercises to explore how to work with Trans, Non-Binary, and Gender Expansive clients. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Based on this session's content, I am able to: define at least two things to watch for when working with T/NB/GE clients.
  • Based on this session's content, I am able to: define gender dysphoria and how it’s used in therapy.
  • Based on this session's content, I am able to: apply at least one identity skill in the therapy room. 

Uncovering Another Family Secret: Child-to-Caregiver Violence     

Steve Simms, PhD, LMFT

Research shows that child-to-caregiver violence (CCV) has dramatically increased across the world. Despite this trend, MFTs responsible for human welfare and well-being across a broad continuum of care often overlook this hidden and stigmatized form of domestic violence. Once exposed, MFTs may struggle to tailor their interventions to feel safe, secure, and confident when engaging threatening children, helpless, hopeless caregivers, and government services designed for other forms of domestic violence and abuse. This presentation helps MFTs describe and apply two strategies for recognizing and responding to CCV. Strategy one is to always screen for CCV. Strategy two is to organize assessment and treatment around a structural-strategic family therapy model. Video recorded clinical sessions illustrate this process. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to describe the Child-to-parent Questionnaire, Parents’ version.
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to how child-to caregiver violence is linked to ruptures in attachment characterized by feeling misunderstood and controlled. 
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to understand how to target child-based symptoms by working through the caregivers. 

Breakout Sessions 2:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

The Undiagnosed Phylogeny of Narcissism in the Black Community     

Dr. Jeannelle

Could narcissism be more prevalent in the Black community than current diagnostic statistics suggest? The compounded impact of neglect, abandonment, physical abuse, sexual abuse, poverty, racism, and high crime can foster narcissistic behavior. In communities overwhelmed by these challenges, how does this affect their ability to form meaningful relationships, and what harm do families face when exposed to a narcissist? Discover the solutions to this complex issue in this segment of "The Undiagnosed Phylogeny of Narcissism in the Black Community."

Learning Objectives:

  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to identify signs and symptoms of Narcissistic Personality Disorder.
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to identify three contributing factors to Narcissistic Personality Disorder.
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to identify treatment options for Narcissistic Personality Disorder. 

Muslim American Couples and Sociocultural Attunement      

Zain Shamoon, PhD

In this session participants will encounter the concept of sociocultural attunement and context sensitivity as it applies to working with Muslim American couples. While this group is vast, and intersectionality must be taken into account, faith-based concepts and family kinship must be taken into account. The importance of cultural sensitivity, and respect for communal understandings of mental health and wellness (distinct from hyper-individualism) will be addressed. The presenter will provided clinical examples. Participants will gain an increased understanding of “both-and” perspectives when weighing the wellness of individuals in the couple alongside the various sub-systems they occupy. An approach based on principles of sociocultural attunement will be offered so that therapists can be more effective with Muslim American couples. Person-of-the-therapist action items for clinicians will also be identified as part of this presentation.

Learning Objectives:

  • Based on this session's content, I can identify the importance of discussing family-of-origin themes with Muslim couples.
  • Based on this session's content, I can identify specific ways to broach the topics of culture and religion with Muslim couples, including ways in which faith enhances their bonds.
  • Based on this session's content, I can identify person-of-the-therapist (POTT) action items that help me practice cultural humility with Muslim couples.

MFT Supervision and Training: Getting Back to the Basics    

John Robbins, PhD, LMFT

Efficacy research suggests that across Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) models, variables that impact the counseling relationship are important predictors of success in counseling (e.g., Hubble, Duncan, & Miller, 1999; Davis, Lebow, & Sprenkle, 2012). These results highlight the importance of enhancing relationship skills, instilling hope, hopefulness of the counselor, and purposeful ways of approaching clinical work as crucial in the change process. MFT models often assume social and relational skills are inherent in counselors, thus there is little focus on these skills, although most models allude to the importance of the therapeutic relationship. Typically, relationship skills are addressed in terms such as empathy, caring, warmth, affirmation, etc., yet this can become secondary to the clinician’s approach to intervening and assisting people in change. As supervisors and clinicians, it is important to get back to basics, both in rapport building and intentional ways of practicing. In this workshop, the presenter will offer how to bring counseling practices back to foundational aspects of family system’s work and relationship building. Focusing on rules, roles, triangles, and boundaries, the presenter challenges participants to simplify their approach, while also offering some strategies for opening up relationship building and productive conversations using improvisation techniques.

Learning Objectives:

  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to apply the fundamental concepts of family systems thinking to training new counselors in the foundational aspects of MFT practice.
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to employ creative exercises to assist counselors in increasing their therapeutic maneuverability.
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to connect the main tenets of improvisational comedy to the basic principles of relationship building and counseling skills.

Tipping the Scales:  Systemic Interventions within the Justice System    

Erin Schaefer, IMFT-S, LPCC-S

Just as individuals operate within a family system, those individuals and families often interact with the justice system. How can MFTs impact this system? How can MFTs help justice system personnel understand the importance of MFT treatment and interventions? Understanding the nuances of the justice system, common challenges for MFTs working within it, and how to help individuals and families walk through this often complex and cumbersome system will be discussed.

Learning Objectives:

  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to learn common terms used in criminal justice settings.
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to identify how MFTs are uniquely positioned to assist families with navigating the criminal justice system. 
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to define methods of systemic intervention for clients and families operating within criminal justice settings. 

Strengthening the Couple Bond in Blended/Stepfamily Marriage Part 1    

Tammy Daughtry

Divorce impacts over a million children a year in the United States and abroad, resulting in millions of co-parents who are trying to navigate the path of shared parenting between households. In this two-part series, we will explore a process of education and facilitation that will help professionals who work with remarried parents and children as they plot a course for their families through these difficult issues. We will expand the professional toolbox with ideas, research, and resources that can be implemented immediately with clients. Part one will focus on introducing Innate Attachment vs. Developing Attachment, Cultivating the Couple Bond, and the Significance of “We” along with several role-play experiential segments to help participants understand and establish a guideline in dealing with this issue.

Learning Objectives:

  • Based on this session's content, I can understand the nature of attachment in the context of blended family dynamics.
  • Based on this session's content, I can understand the importance of "bio time" in a blended family.
  • Based on this session's content, I am able to begin to plan a course of action for clients in blended families.

Bringing Family Therapy to Trans Youth    

May Ragna Fianna

Trans youth experience rates of physical assault, sexual assault, homelessness, and suicide attempts many times their cisgender peers. But one factor protects trans children from these outcomes: family support. After nearly a decade of experience, I share my hard learned lessons for working with families of trans youth using family systems theory. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Based on this session's content, I can name risk factors affecting trans youth.
  • Based on this session's content, I can translate family systems theory for use with trans youth.
  • Based on this session's content, I can understand the lived experiences of trans youth and their families.

Breakout Sessions 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

A Primer on Working with Military Families: Cultural Competency, Resources, and Professional Development    

Kayla Fitzke, PhD, LMFT

Nichole Huff, PhD, CFLE

In 2022, the total number of U.S. military personnel, including active-duty, reserve, and Guard members, was 2,071,451 (DoD, 2022). When including service members’ family connections (i.e., spouses, minor children, adult/other dependents), the total estimated military-connected population topped 4.5 million individuals. In addition to navigating life events common to all families, military families are also vulnerable to challenges associated with navigating the ever-evolving military landscape. It is critical for therapists to have military cultural competency when working with military families. This includes awareness of the military family readiness system and the resources available to military families. This session will provide therapists with a working knowledge of the unique environment in which military families exist, as well as the available supports and resources therapists can leverage and/or refer to when working with military families. Additionally, given the ever-evolving nature of the military landscape, this session will highlight opportunities for professional development for therapists seeking to stay up to date on the latest policies and issues relevant for providers working with military families, specifically through OneOp. The OneOp network is a collaboration between the Department of Defense, Cooperative Extension, and university subject matter experts producing open-access, research-based professional development for providers serving military families. OneOp offers no-cost continuing education (CEs) spanning a variety of subject areas relevant to MFTs interested in working with military families. Time will be reserved for Q&A.

Learning Objectives:

  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to describe the unique challenges military families may face. 
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to identify appropriate military family resources for collaboration and/or referral. 
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to identify where to go for professional development opportunities to learn more about working with military families.

Utilizing Telesupervision to Prepare Trainees To Provide Online and Onground Therapy    

Dale Bertram, PhD, LMFT

After the pandemic, there was a pronounced shift toward online therapy and online supervision. In this workshop, we explore how telesupervision can be utilized to equip supervisees to provide effective online and on-ground therapy.

Learning Objectives:

  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to describe resources that are essential for supervisors to give to supervisees to review in order to provide effective online therapy.
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to describe how to provide effective observable data supervision online to equip supervisees for providing online therapy.
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to describe how supervisors can utilize Janusian thinking related questions can help equip supervisees for online and on-ground therapy.

Advancing Disability Affirmative Therapy in Marriage and Family Therapy: Bridging Gaps for Inclusive Practice    

Manasi Shankar, PhD, LPCC, LPC, NCC

Disability research has made significant strides over the past few decades, navigating dynamic shifts in conceptualizations, language use, and the operationalization of disability. Despite the inherently systemic nature of disability from a Social Model perspective, scholars and researchers in this field often struggle to establish a prominent presence within marriage and family therapy (MFT). This gap substantially impacts the clinical services provided to clients.
 
My presentation underscores the critical need for enhanced disability discourse and training within the MFT field. It highlights the historical and current contributions of family scholars to disability research, focusing on past achievements of MFTs and the potential for the field to holistically support clients with disabilities, ensuring that key aspects of their identity are not overlooked. Drawing from current empirical research, the presentation addresses the needs of the disabled community at individual, policy, and familial levels. Additionally, it offers practical strategies for practicing Disability Affirmative Therapy, guiding clinicians in creating therapy experiences that are affirming, collaborative, integrative, and inclusive.

Learning Objectives:

  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to apply client-centered inquiries and culturally sensitive considerations during the initial phase of therapy with disabled clients, maximizing their sense of safety, comfort, and empowerment within the therapeutic environment.
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to utilize Walsh's Family Resilience Framework to structure disability-affirmative care recommendations, focusing on family belief systems, organizational patterns, communication/problem-solving, and collaborative resource access to enhance family resilience and support.
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to implement specific clinical interventions aimed at enhancing communication, fostering a sense of connectedness, and addressing structural dynamics within the family unit of disabled individuals, promoting holistic well-being, social inclusion, and empowerment.

The Demand/Withdraw Pattern in Couple Relationships: Implications for Therapists    

Ryan Seedall, LMFT

This session will address the importance of patterns and processes in couple relationships for SFTs. In particular, we will address the demand/withdraw pattern. We will briefly summarize some of our team’s research regarding the gender and attachment dynamics associated with demand/withdraw. We will also explain how to understand the demand/withdraw pattern from an interpersonal neurobiology perspective—in particular, how the window of tolerance relates to demand/withdraw patterns. A large portion of this session will address the clinical implications of demand/withdraw research, including how to more use interventions that more fully address gender and attachment dynamics associated with demand/withdraw. We will also discuss interventions for addressing demand/withdraw patterns within the couple sexual relationship. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to understand demand/withdraw dynamics, including from an interpersonal neurobiology perspective.
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to summarize relevant gender and attachment dynamics associated with both demand and withdraw behaviors.
  • Based on this session’s content, I am able to identify core intervention pathways for working with demand/withdraw in couple relationships.

A “How-To” of Writing Gender-Affirming Care Letters: An Opportunity for Applied Practice    

Coltan Schoenike, MS

With visible increases in transgender and gender diverse clients seeking mental health care, a common pain point for many therapists is the unfamiliar territory they are faced with when a current or prospective client mentions seeking a letter for gender-affirming care. If a provider has never written one before and feels they don’t know how, this can certainly be quite intimidating. In worst-case-scenarios, this can even lead to swaths of providers referring out, feeling that they are not adequately “qualified” to write letters, and transgender clients experiencing increases in barriers to care that is already difficult to access as is. In valuing experiential learning and play, this interactive workshop will start with a brief presentation highlighting the various components of gender-affirming care letters and what goes into writing one. After the brief presentation, attendees will have the interactive opportunity within small groups to work together and practice writing a gender-affirming care letter for a fictionalized client case file all while receiving guidance, feedback, and support from the presenter. Through this practice, attendees will be able to build confidence and have practical experience having written a letter, alleviating those anxieties of unfamiliar territory.

Learning Objectives:

  • Based on this session's content, I can understand the various procedures or treatments transgender and gender-diverse clients may be seeking and, thus, the various types of letters that may be requested of me as a mental health provider so these clients may access that care.
  • Based on this session's content, I can successfully navigate the complicated and nuanced discussions inherent to current structures of letter requirements including conversations of access versus gatekeeping and assessment versus informed consent models.
  • Based on this session's content, I can confidently and competently write gender-affirming care letters for transgender and gender-diverse clients if such is necessary for their access to needed gender-affirming care.

Strengthening the Couple Bond in Blended/Stepfamily Marriage Part 2    

Tammy Daughtry

In part 2 of this series, participants will focus on co-parenting between homes with a special focus on communication, handling the hand-offs, and co-parenting meetings. Participants will delve deeper into the categories of co-parenting and their impact on children, defining family and strengthening connections through separation. Role-play and video will be used to help participants understand how to help clients navigate using these methods.

Learning Objectives:

  • Based on this session's content, I am able to name and describe the five categories of co-parenting and their impact on children.
  • Based on this session's content, I am able to define the elements needed to have a successful blended/stepfamily.
  • Based on this session's content, I am able to further develop ways in which I can use these skills to help parents and children navigate their own blended families.